WHAT BOAT WOULD THAT BE THEN?

HOW do they work that one out? More to the point, how does George Osborne, shadow chancellor, work that one out? In his speech to the Tory party conference he says, justifying potential reductions in public sector pay, that we’ll all have to make sacrifices: ‘We’re all in this together” was the phrase. Well I’ve got news for Mr Osborne – we’re not. The people who’re “in it” are us. The ordinary, hard-working families that Gordon Brown likes to bang on about. I’m a long way from being a Tory supporter, just about as far now from supporting the Labour shower (after a lifetime of Labour voting I realise they’re just the same, with a few notable exceptions, as every other money-grubbing, power-hungry politician, except they have the nerve to call themselves socialists) and realise that whoever comes to power we’ll have a massive problem with public debt. But for an MP to suggest that they’re in the same position as ordinary folk is ludicrous. (Beth was so angry about it she rang me to have a rant: her mother’s daughter, then). Anyway, I’ve written to the Telegraph today to vent my anger. Will they print it? Well, the Independent used my Sarah Brown moan on Friday, so I’m hopeful. A bit, anyway.

Meanwhile I’m still trying to work out whether I am indeed one of Gordon’s hard-working majority, or the feckless minority who stay in bed til dinner-time, or indeed the ‘privileged few’ who deserve a bashing from the Labour government which – of course – hates rich people. Unless it’s one of  their rich people: those who’ve become rich through switching houses and asking us to feed them to the tune of £400 a month (no receipts necessary). Anyway, it just shows the dangers and the folly of politicians trying to pigeonhole us. I sometimes work hard – when we’ve got paying guests, for example – sometimes stay in bed til 10.00 (not quite lunchtime but near enough) if there’s something good on the radio, and am definitely, definitely privileged. I only have to look out of my back window to realise that. But how did I become privileged? I left school at 16 and worked b***** hard, earning a living and rearing a family, that’s how. So don’t lecture me, Mr Brown, about the punishments deserved by the privileged. And don’t tell me, Mr Osborne, that I’m in the same boat as you. In fact, I don’t want any politician telling me anything, ever again, unless it’s Boris Johnson or Austin Mitchell, who at least make me laugh.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s